Author Archives: Still the Lucky Few

When Spring Finally Comes, Will You Be Happy?

It’s been a long, grueling winter in some parts of the Northern Hemisphere, but Spring is just around the corner, we hear. Is it really just around the corner, (it’s only mid-February) and when it arrives, will it make us forget winter, and be happy? Looking forward to spring, and expecting to feel better when it arrives is not a new thing. People have always done that—along with giving Spring some mystical powers.

So what is it about spring that fascinates us, and stirs us, and makes some of want to jump for joy? read more

Honor the Memory of a Loved One with a Home Memorial Service

This week’s article is written by guest writer, Teresa Greenhill, who has an interest in mental health. She is the co-creator of MentalHealthForSeniors.com,  which is dedicated to providing seniors with information on physical and mental fitness so that they can be active and happy in their later years.
Please leave comments for this article below, in the usual form.

Losing a loved one is difficult. Yet, amid the painful loss, you want to give your loved one the greatest honor. A memorial service at home can be a special and meaningful way to express love and respect for the deceased.

Although the terms funeral service and memorial service are often used interchangeably, they are not synonymous. Unlike in a memorial service, the body of the deceased is present during a funeral service.

Why a memorial service?

It can be emotional to let go until you feel that you have appropriately honored the deceased. A memorial service gives you an opportunity to celebrate the life lived by the deceased. It is an opportunity to come together with friends and family to share the memories of the beloved and say goodbye. read more

New Study—Millennials Speak their Minds!

It’s only a matter of time. The massive Millennial generation born between 1980 and 2002, is waking up, and waiting for its moment to change the political landscape of America.

Popular notions, many of them negative, have been circulating in leading newspapers and online media everywhere over the past few years. I’ve been following the discussion as well, and wrote about them in recent blogs, here and here.

Attention and controversy have followed the Millennials, ever since they emerged as the biggest population group in American history. read more

The Post—Three Compelling Reasons to See This Movie

We choose our movies carefully these days, opting to stay comfortably at home, rather than brave the winter weather. But when The Post was mentioned several times on television and in the papers, it piqued our interest. And then it was announced that it was up for two Oscars, so we just had to go.

It was clear to us immediately that the release of the film this year was no accident. Like other movies about the Pentagon Papers, familiar to Bob and me—All the President’s Men (1976), Klute (1971), and The Parallax View (1974), this movie centered on the Nixon presidency, and its lawless attempts to withhold information about the government’s 30 year involvement with the Vietnam war. read more

Oh, Those January Blues!

January, rain, weather, Blues, SADIt’s January, here in the Pacific North West. It’s the tail end of a 3 month period of precious little sunlight, and I think it’s getting to me. I wake early, as I always do, full of optimism and ambition, and then I remember. Oh, yeah, the weather.

I hesitate, just for a moment, and then, in a band-aid ripping motion, I snap the blinds open. Just as always lately, it’s another grey, shapeless, sunless day in Victoria.

This morning, I decided to test my thesis about our lack of sunshine. My first comparison was with other cities in Canada. A few key strokes, and I had the verdict: read more

How Long Can Humans Live? Seven Theories and a Quiz

You might think that you have heard everything there is to know about how long humans can live, but even in this overworked corner of human research, there is always something new.

Over the last few decades. we have watched in awe as longevity statistics have exploded. For people in industrialized countries, life expectancy, at the beginning of the 20th century, was between 30 and 45 years, rising steadily to about 67 years by the end of the century. Life expectancy continues to rise until now, people who live to age 100 or older are the fastest growing demographic. In the past, researchers have looked to improvements in health care, nutrition, and standard of living to explain why some people live significantly longer than others. Other researchers have redirected their attention to the habits of super-centenarians, or the detection of ‘blue zone’ areas of the world in which people live to an exceptional age. read more

Vibrant Health—Yours at Any Age!

The statistics are stunning. Current research on the impact of exercise on health, tracking 660,000 people from the United States and Sweden, and using 150 minutes of moderate walking per week as a guideline, says that participants, who were compared to people who didn’t exercise at all, had a 20% lower risk of dying during the follow-up period of up to 14 years.

A recent article in The American Journal of Medicine, reporting on the work of Dr. Harvey B. Simon, who analyzed several studies, says that even moderate physical activity of one hour a week pointed to lower rates of heart attack, stroke and death from all causes. read more

We made it! It’s New Year’s Eve!

PLEASE CLICK ON TITLE ABOVE
“We made it! It’s New Year’s Eve! TO COMMENT!
Or, click on “Read More” below.

It’s New Year’s Eve—the year has flown by, and it’s time for a new video! I enjoyed doing it, and I hope it gives you an idea of my intentions for this blog this year. Thank you again for participating as a reader and a special thanks if you comment. I love to hear what you have to say!

May you have the best of everything in 2018—the best health, the best experiences and the best progress in what you are choosing to do! read more

A Christmas Greeting For 2017

My Christmas greeting is a big Thank You to you, my readers, for motivating me to search for new and compelling topics each week, for keeping me on my toes, and staying conscious in my writing. I value your thoughtful comments, and occasional challenges.

You always let me know when I have piqued your interest, or inspired you, or expressed views that are different from yours. Thank you for your directness and honesty!

I started my 2016 writing immersed in the whirlwind of the American election, when a new government had taken hold, and frightened us all with its invective. And I got right into it too, as you can see from those January posts—but eventually I tried to move away from that focus, and present a more optimistic world view. read more

Christmas Lights, and What They Really Mean

Last week our volunteer light-up crew put up Christmas lights in and around our condo building, something they do every year. For centuries, people have displayed special lights at Christmas, a clever tradition designed to offset the darkness of winter. It’s the one of the few Christmas customs I enthusiastically embrace.

Like many people of my generation I grew up on a farm, in my case, an isolated Canadian prairie homestead. Growing up in the 1940s and 1050s, before electricity found its way to our outpost home, I woke up in the dark during winter, and went to bed in the dark. The only light available to us was a kerosene lamp, a flashlight, and the light from our constantly burning wood stove. read more

What an Older Person in Recovery Needs During the Holidays

 This week’s article is written by guest writer, Teresa Greenhill, who has an interest in mental health. She is the co-creator of MentalHealthForSeniors.com,  which is dedicated to providing seniors with information on physical and mental fitness so that they can be active and happy in their later years.

Please leave comments for this article below, in the usual form.

For more and more aging baby boomers, alcohol or other forms of self-medication have become coping mechanisms for dealing with aches and pains, including loneliness. This time of year can be difficult, with the holidays adding stress over seeing family members we may not be close to. If you’re an older person who is recovering from addiction, the holidays can be especially painful as we face them with family members who we have strained relationships with or, worse, alone. Addiction recovery is a long process, with many stops and starts along the way. Adding emotional triggers to the mix can put a recovering addict over the top. If you’re in recovery or have a family member who is, what can you do to be safe throughout the holiday season? Here are some tips. read more

Aging in Place With ElliQ and Other Innovations

Scientists and researchers are working overtime to help older people age in place. And that’s a good thing—most of us do want to stay at home as long as we can.

One company pursuing this is K4Connect, a tech firm that serves older adults with disabilities. The CEO, Scott Moody has a dream, and it has a good chance of coming true.

Moody thinks in broad strokes. He believes that in five years home automation for older adults, still very complex, will connect us to the “Internet of Things” (IoT), allowing us to seamlessly access apps that will help us age in place. He envisions: read more