Tag Archives: longevity

How Long Can Humans Live? Seven Theories and a Quiz

You might think that you have heard everything there is to know about how long humans can live, but even in this overworked corner of human research, there is always something new.

Over the last few decades. we have watched in awe as longevity statistics have exploded. For people in industrialized countries, life expectancy, at the beginning of the 20th century, was between 30 and 45 years, rising steadily to about 67 years by the end of the century. Life expectancy continues to rise until now, people who live to age 100 or older are the fastest growing demographic. In the past, researchers have looked to improvements in health care, nutrition, and standard of living to explain why some people live significantly longer than others. Other researchers have redirected their attention to the habits of super-centenarians, or the detection of ‘blue zone’ areas of the world in which people live to an exceptional age. read more

Defeating Ageism – Are Boomers Taking All the Credit?

defeating ageism

Defeating Ageism – Are Boomers Taking All the Credit?

I’m within spitting distance of being a Boomer, but I’m not proud of what some Boomers have been saying about the gains being made in addressing & defeating ageism. A lot has been happening around this thorny issue. Two or three years ago, there was barely a ripple on the topic in mainstream media, only an article or two in a newspaper or blog. Suddenly it’s everywhere, on Twitter, on Facebook, in pod casts, videos and blogs. It’s as if a faucet has been turned on and these ideas, which used to be relegated to the back pages—old people going on about being laughed at, ignored and excluded—have become a self-sustaining newsfeed. read more

The Longevity Explosion

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Long life is our greatest achievement. We, the Lucky Few, have lived longer than all previous generations.

In “Redesigning Long Life“, the Stanford Center on Longevity reports,

Over the next 30 years, the US population age 65+ will double from 40 million to 80 million, and the share of old people will increase from 13% to 20%. By the time the last baby boomer turns 65 in 2029, one in five Americans will be age 65 or older. By 2032, there will be more people age 65 or older than children under 15. read more